A Direct Contact Source

LSA-path-to-purchase

According to 2015 LSA Local Media Tracking Study, the company site when visited by a prospective user is already showing one is ready to make a purchase. I like the idea of a search engine online such as Google, but I also think it isn’t the fairest to have recommended a good product or service.

Having said this, there are many good products/services beyond the page 1 of the search results. What’s happening is that they are not good in Search Engine Optimization, but they’re good in their development of their products or in rendering of their services.

Next of importance would be review sites. Those with a good talent and finding it hard to show and present themselves can try to get an interview conducted about them or their skills to showcase his/her strengths.

It is a tough competition, but I think having a good design and a well designed company website is very important today than any other time. Especially if you’re a small company, you can compete side by side, 24/7 with the big giants (competitors). The most important thing is you must be able to DELIVER as promised.

http://www.uxscoops.com

 

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Crossmedia

Cross-media videos

Transmedia Storytelling

Digital marketing

Crossmedia campaigns are getting more important

Who is Peter Lang

He wrote a book: The edited volume includes chapters by authors from three continents who approach the phenomenon from different disciplinary angles: semiotics, cultural studies, media economics, political economy, innovation studies. The common interest lies in the dynamics that lead to experiments with crossmedia and in how our cultures are innovated through such practices.

2014 Crossmedia =

Storytelling

Crossmedia vs transmedia

Franchise development vs decentralised authors (storytelling)

Transmedia storytelling is the future of marketing (Steve Rubel)

Guru: Jeff Gomez, 3 basic rules to transmedia storytelling

1) Your story needs to have some kind of aspirational quality. It needs to be meaningful. If your story is violent and really a downer, it’s not going to be enough of a draw for people to follow it across multiple platforms. There’s an upbeat quality to most successful transmedia stories. It’s got to be a story world you want to spend time in.

2) You have to understand the media platforms that you will have at hand. If you’re an independent creator with a little budget, you still have access to social media, the web, independent digital publishing. You need to understand the language of each of those platforms. If you don’t want to, find someone who can help you understand the strengths and weakness of each of those platforms. You need to be able to design your story to play to those strengths and avoid those weaknesses. You’re already developing a design sensibility for the media platforms you have at hand which will help you develop the story and ultimately, produce it.

3) You need to think about and ultimate build an architecture for dialogue around your transmedia implementation. This, in essence, gives your audience the ability to provide you with feedback. You can make it fancy and have that become a part of the narrative if you want where your characters can literally communicate with the audience, but that’s not a requirement and it’s tricky to do that. We now have the ability as storytellers to look into the eyes of our audience and to validate their participation — by which I mean the audience has a need to express themselves – from their opinions about what it is they’re experiencing with your story to creative content and story-driven user-generated content. They’re doing more and more of this in social media. It is my belief that if you ignore them, they’ll go away.